Sneak preview – Mooc – Bart Baesens – Credit Risk Analytics

Baesens_Bart_small     Big Data World
I had a nice lunch with Prof. Dr Bart Baesens today at the MIM to discuss his recent book ‘Analytics in a Big Data World: The Essential Guide to Data Science and its Applications’
One topic we discussed was knowledge transfer and certification.
Next to the recorded presentations already available on dataminingapps.com, the professor told me that his new course about Credit Risk Analytics would soon be released. Here is for you, in avant première, the content of this course that he has put together with SAS. This course will be available mid November 2014.

New e-learning course Credit Risk Analytics by professor Bart Baesens

The outline of the course is as follows:
Lesson 1: Introduction to Credit Scoring
Lesson 2: The Basel Capital Accords
Lesson 3: Preparing the data for credit scoring
Lesson 4: Classification for credit scoring
Lesson 5: Measuring the Performance of Credit Scoring Classification Models
Lesson 6: Variable Selection for Classification
Lesson 7: Issues in Scorecard Construction
Lesson 8: Defining Default Ratings and Calibrating PD
Lesson 9: LGD modeling
Lesson 10: EAD modeling
Lesson 11: Validation of Credit Risk Models
Lesson 12: Low Default Portfolios
Lesson 13: Stress testing
You are invited to send an email to Bart.Baesens@gmail.com if interested in more information.
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Article – Internet of Things (IoT) – What it is and why it matters

Our next meetup will be focused on Internet of Things. http://meetu.ps/2vLNvg .
It’s Official: The Internet Of Things Takes Over #BigData As The Most Hyped Technology http://onforb.es/1ricSSH . 
Here is a nice article by SAS about the subject.

Internet of Things (IoT)

What it is and why it matters

The Internet of Things is a growing network of everyday objects – from industrial machines to consumer goods – that can share information and complete tasks while you are busy with other activities, like work, sleep or exercise.

Soon, our cars, our homes, our major appliances and even our city streets will be connected to the Internet – creating this network of objects that is called the Internet of Things, or IoT for short.

Made up of millions of sensors and devices that generate incessant streams of data, the IoT can be used to improve our lives and our businesses in many ways. But how does it work? And what are these things that are part of the network?

The Internet of Things consists of three main components:

  1. The things (or assets) themselves.
  2. The communication networks connecting them.
  3. The computing systems that process and make use of the data that our things transmit and receive.

 

Her the article  article by SAS about the subject.