#disummit – Executive Workshops – Brussels 30 March – Register Now

Executive WorkshopsDuring this year’s summit you will hear stories on how data is used to build a better world.

On March 30th we have invited an impressive lineup of top speakers and prepared in depth training classes for managers and data scientists.

We are also offering you 5 exclusive C-Level workshops:

  • 29 March 16:00 – 3h Workshop from Dirk BorneCommunicating Data Literacy and the Value of Data to Clients and Colleagues
  • 30 March 10:45 – 2h Workshop from Geert VerstraetenIntroducing Predictive Analytics – more
  • 30 March 13:45 – 1h Workshop from Natalino BusaPositioning Open Source in your existing software architecture
  • 30 March 13:45 – 1h Workshop from Stephen BrobstLeadership and Digital Transformation – more
  • 30 March 17:00 – Closing Keynote from Kirk BorneA Data-rich World for a Better World: From Sensors to Sense-Making
  • Please check disummit.com form more exciting presentations.

Executive Workshop on Leadership and Digital Transformation

 

DiS17_Speaker_Stephen Brobst

Every industry will be transformed by the new business models and revolutionary possibilities created by digital society in the 21stcentury.

This talk will address the critical success factors that leaders must embrace when transforming an enterprise into a player for the digital age. 

We will discuss the importance of data-driven business models to transform from traditional customer relationship management to customer experience management in the new world of digitally enabled customers.

We will present a framework that will emphasize the importance of real-time recommendation engines leveraging operational intelligence using self-learning algorithms with techniques drawn from the world of artificial intelligence and machine learning.

We will also propose an approach for monetizing data as a critical success factor for all enterprises who want to be successful in the digital age.  Issues such as enabling cultural change, organizational skill set requirements, and governance will also be discussed.  Case study examples of organizations that have been successful in executing digital transformation will be used throughout the presentation.

About Stephen:

Stephen Brobst is the Chief Technology Officer for Teradata Corporation.  Stephen performed his graduate work in Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where his Masters and PhD research focused on high-performance parallel processing. He also completed an MBA with joint course and thesis work at the Harvard Business School and the MIT Sloan School of Management.  Stephen is a TDWI Fellow and has been on the faculty of The Data Warehousing Institute since 1996.  During Barack Obama’s first term he was also appointed to the Presidential Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) in the working group on Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD).  He was recently ranked by ExecRank as the #4 CTO in the United States (behind the CTOs from Amazon.com, Tesla Motors, and Intel) out of a pool of 10,000+ CTOs.

Take aways from his presentation:

  • Learn about the critical success factors for competing effectively in the digital world.
  • Learn about the cultural and organizational skill set requirements for transforming into a digital business.
  • Learn how to use effective governance to transform from a traditional business model to a digitally enabled business model while sustaining profitable operations.

When:

  • 30 March 2017 14:45 during the Data Innovation Summit
  • DISUMMIT @ING Marnix, Troonstraat 1, 1000 Brussel

Stephen’s previous presentation in Belgium:

Stephen gave an executive session at the Hub in the summer of 2016. He then shared  his views on the importance of open data, open source, analytics in the cloud and data science. Over 100 executives left the workshop that day inspired and armed with some actionable ideas that helped them define a profitable strategy for their data science teams.

Here is the link to his presentation: https://youtu.be/jyj55qQqhGw

Who might be interested:

  • Executives and directors involved in a digital transformation projects
  • Change and innovation managers
  • Specialists focussing on data innovation and management
  • Students aspiring to becoming one or all of the above

Register your seat now:

Here is the link to his presentation: https://dis2017.eventbrite.co.uk

Other Executive sessions during di-Summit:

  • 29 March 16:00 – 3h Workshop from Dirk Borne: Communicating Data Literacy and the Value of Data to Clients and Colleagues
  • 30 March 10:45 – 2h Workshop from Geert Verstraeten: Introducing Predictive Analytics 
  • 30 March 13:45 – 1h Workshop from Natalino Busa: Positioning Open Source in your existing software architecture
  • 30 March 17:00 – Closing Keynote from Kirk Borne: A Data-rich World for a Better World: From Sensors to Sense-Making
  • Please check disummit.com form more exciting presentations.

 

Mons OCT 24 – Big Data et Vie privée -Vincent Blondel

 

vincent-blondelEn prélude à la Big Data Week 2016 :

Grande conférence de Vincent Blondel, recteur de l’UCL

Big data et Vie privée

Lundi 24 octobre à 19 heures, Au Mundaneum à Mons

Introduction par Monsieur Philippe Busquin, Ministre d’Etat et Commissaire européen chargé de la Recherche scientifique de 1999 à 2004

« L’Internet promeut nos libertés et est source de possibilités extraordinaires. En même temps, les technologies de l’information et de la communication créent des risques majeurs vis à vis de nos libertés et de la protection de notre vie privée. La surveillance sous toutes ses formes est devenue commune et les grands acteurs de l’internet et les États ne s’en privent pas. Les révélations de Snowden ont ouvert bien des yeux. Les technologies qui permettent de nous espionner peuvent pourtant aussi servir à nous protéger. Mais où trouver l’équilibre ? »

(Académie Royale de Belgique)

Vincent Blondel est recteur de l’Université catholique de Louvain depuis le 1er septembre 2014. Ses recherches sont à l’interface des mathématiques et des technologies de l’information. Il a obtenu un Master of Science à l’Imperial College à Londres et a réalisé des postdoctorats à Oxford, Stockholm et Paris. Il a été professeur invité au MIT, ainsi que Fulbright Scholar et a été invité à intervenir dans de nombreuses institutions, dont Stanford, Harvard, Princeton et Cambridge. Il a en outre collaboré à de nombreux projets transversaux à l’UCL.

Le débat à l’issue de la conférence sera modéré par André Blavier (Agence du Numérique).

Une conférence organisée par le Mundaneum en collaboration avec l’UCL et digital wallonia

Le Mundaneum est partenaire de l’année académique 2016-2017 de l’UCL placée sous le signe de l’ « Aventure scientifique ».

Adresse du jour : Mundaneum, rue de Nimy 76 à 7000 Mons (Belgique)

Inscription souhaitée : info@mundaneum.be ou 065/31.53.43

mundaneum

 

Big Data and Ethics Meetup – Call for ideas/speakers.

ethicsPierre-Nicolas Schwab, the Big Data / CRM manager at RTBF (French-speaking public television) will organize in December a conference on ethical aspects of Big Data in the broadcasting industry. Although this conference will be reserved for members of the European Broadcasting Union (www.ebu.ch), Pierre-Nicolas would be interested to share views with Hub’s members on the topic of Big Data and Ethics.

I think Big Data and Ethics is a topic of importance that we’ve insufficiently covered until now during the diSummit nor our Meetups. I’d like our community  to contribute to this topic through the organization of a special meetup on November 17th. I am asking interested members to contact me if they want to contribute to this event in the form of presentation.

Specific topics could be:

  • Good and bad practices as far as data usage is concerned
  • Examples of Big Data cases that triggered negative reactions
  • The consumer’s perspective: does sharing data with third parties add value for the customer or for the firm?
  • Implicit limits existing in your industry as far as the use of customers’ data is concerned
  • Paradigm shifts and possible unethical changes caused by Big Data modelling in your industry
  • Changes brought by IoT and possible threats to privacy and ethics
  • Measurement of intrusiveness / perception of intrusiveness by users
  • Forward-looking cross-industry trends that may have a negative impact on customers’ perceptions of Big Data

I welcome expressions of interest for this topic and would be glad to organize a preparatory meeting with interested speakers. Pierre-Nicolas has already proposed to host this meeting at RTBF to have fruitful discussions.

Thank you in advance for your answers.

Philippe


Previous post on this topic: https://datasciencebe.com/2016/08/16/next-executive-session-what-about-a-debate-on-big-data-ethics/

Next Executive Session: What about a debate on Big Data & Ethics ?

Pierre Nicolas Schwab -EBU_Big_Data

 

Next Executive Sessions :

After the interesting talk of Stephen Brobst CTO#4 we now want to organise a debate on Big Data & Ethics. Pierre-Nicolas is proposing the following format: Short presentations by each participant representing the vision of his/her company followed by a debate. Any suggestions ? Who wants to participate ?

 

Philippe, Puis-je te proposer que tu organises un atelier de travail avec une dizaine de responsables Big Data sur l’éthique et le Big Data ? 
Il faudrait limiter l’audience à des décisionnaires Big Data qui puissent vraiment représenter le point de vue de leur société.
En termes de structuration :
 – 10-15 min (TED format) de présentation de chaque société sur les enjeux éthiques, sur la manière dont les algorithms sont conçus pour tenir compte de ces aspects éthiques, sur les enjeux et limites du Big Data, ce que les entreprises s’interdisent de faire en termes de collecte de données (la “ligne rouge” à ne pas dépasser)
 – un atelier d’échanges / débat

 


Here is some inspiration on the topic.

The RTBF’s big data expert Pierre Nicolas Schwab reflects on how to develop algorithms for PSM which match their values and mitigate the potential flaws of artificial intelligence. He invites EBU Big Data Initiative participants to join the RTBF workshop addressing this issue this December in Brussels.

“Most large companies are investing massively in Big Data technologies to leverage the value of their data. While many still consider Big Data as an inescapable business trend, concerns are growing regarding the impact of Big Data on our daily lives.

A ‘man vs machine’ Artificial Intelligence (AI) milestone was reached in March this year when the deep-learning algorithm AlphaGo defeated one of the world’s best players at Go, Lee Sedol. In an article I published before the game, I was wondering how advances in AI were changing our lives. Cathy O’Neil, a Harvard PhD mathematician, expressed similar concerns at the USI conference in Paris in early June and will be releasing her book “Weapons of Math Destructions” in September. This book elaborates on the concerns she has expressed on her blog about ill-based decisions triggered by algorithms and how big data “increases inequality and threatens democracy”. The title may be provocative but promises to go beyond the filter bubble effect made popular by Eli Pariser.

Because algorithms are only as good as those who build them, we need to open up the models, and not only the data. Those models need to be subject to criticism, peer-review and third-party scrutiny. This will avoid the use of biased or even dangerous algorithms (e.g. the French universities selection algorithm scandal revealed earlier this month) and will increase people’s trust in organizations which use algorithms. To illustrate the latter, the French fiscal authorities are now forced to render public the criteria that play a role when submitting a tax payer to a control. This exemplifies that a change is ongoing and, as PSM, we must embrace and support it.

Not only must we avoid replicating flawed models (in particular recommendation algorithms that trap users in “filter bubbles”) but we, as public organizations, have duties towards our democratic societies and their citizens. That’s why we need to (1) engage in a global reflection on how our algorithms need to be shaped to reflect our values and (2) pave the way for better practices that will inspire other organizations in different industries.